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"In the last 15 years, one in three Detroit properties have been foreclosed on. When most people think of foreclosure, they think of people who can’t afford to pay off their mortgages."

"Canvassers are telling homeowners about workshops on property tax exemption happening over the coming weeks in each of Detroit’s seven city council districts. At the workshops, homeowners will meet with tax foreclosure prevention counselors from United Community Housing Coalition who can help them figure out if they are eligible for the savings and, if so, how to apply."

"UCHC and the Quicken Loans Community Investment Fund (QLCIF) will be partnering with an additional eight community development organizations on "an extensive education effort addressing the pervasive issue of tax foreclosure in Detroit."

"The county requires that tax-delinquent homeowners pay 10% of the total tax owed to enter a reduced-interest payment plan, but for Detroiters living in poverty, that’s an insurmountably high bar.  A two-year, $500,000 grant made by the McGregor Fund to the United Community Housing Coalition would have helped -- part of the grant would have covered the 10%, buying homeowners time to pay off the total tax debt."

"Oberholtzer said she helped roughly 40 people apply for tax exemptions up through the end of the auction. She said this year’s auction was particularly devastating to her clients. She says of 140 homes owned by her clients, 100 were sold at auction."

"The Quicken Loans Community Investment Fund (QLCIF) has partnered with the United Community Housing Coalition (UCHC) and eight community development organizations to launch an extensive education effort addressing the pervasive issue of tax foreclosure in Detroit. This door-to-door outreach will attempt to reach all 60,000 residential properties behind on property taxes and connect residents at risk of tax foreclosure to resources."

"A last-ditch effort is underway to help tax-foreclosed homeowners avoid displacement — but will it work?"

Crain's Detroit Business
October 11 2017 
"Homeownership gives families an opportunity to thrive and grow equity in their homes," Phillips said in a statement. "But when foreclosed homes are purchased by investors at the tax auction, occupants are evicted, investor-owned homes are often neglected and blighted, and neighborhoods quickly destabilize. Keeping families in their homes directly benefits the families, their neighborhoods, and the city."

Detroit Metro Times
October 4 2017 
"The number of occupied homes in this year’s tax foreclosure auction is far lower than recent years, with city and county officials attributing the improvement to a reduced-interest payment plan and better outreach to promote assistance available. But housing advocates have said the lower number of homes in the auction belies the fact that tens of thousands of households are still at least two years behind on their taxes — meaning they could soon receive foreclosure notices and wind up next year’s auction. About 36,000 Wayne County residents are currently on payment plans for the taxes they owe on their homes."

Crain's Detroit Business
October 3 2017 
"The moves will keep the renters in their homes, allow them to become homeowners and build equity as the city's housing market comes back."

Michigan Radio
September 25 2017 
"There's 80 tenants that we hope will be able to buy the homes that they're occupying for a portion of the taxes that their landlord failed to pay," says Phillips. "They're either going to basically buy directly from the city, or if they don't have sufficient funds, we will buy it and then sell to them for the cost of what it took to do that."

Crain's Detroit Business
September 20 2017 
Denise Tanks, a mother of two, was renting a home on Detroit's west side that was foreclosed upon after the landlord didn't pay the property taxes. She's now working with the United Community Housing Coalition to buy the home after the foreclosure is complete. Tanks spoke Tuesday at a news conference at the Butzel Family Recreation Center.”

Model D
September 11 2017 
Frederick is among hundreds of residents who have volunteered their time to clean up, beautify, and revitalize their neighborhood with the assistance of the Grandmont Rosedale Development Corporation (GRDC) and its Vacant Property Task Force throughout the last several years. ... The task force advocates for the demolition of blighted properties and has worked with Detroit Future City's Implementation Office to install landscaping that manages storm water runoff. It also partners with the United Community Housing Coalition and U-Snap-Bac to offer annual tax foreclosure prevention workshops to teach residents about assistance programs.

“I see thousands of people every year who need help,” says Michele Oberholtzer, founder of the Tricycle Collective, a non-profit helping Detroiters at risk of foreclosure. She also helps residents apply for the Step Forward program at the United Community Housing Coalition. “What we see in terms of the application for homeowners, is it’s very, very few people who are approved [for Step Forward Michigan.] I council my clients: ‘This is like a free lottery ticket. It doesn’t hurt to apply, but you’re very unlikely to win.’”

"A public forum on June 17 addressed the continuing tax foreclosure crisis in Detroit that has left thousands of families facing imminent eviction from their homes.  The forum was organized by the Coalition to Stop Unconstitutional Property Tax Foreclosures, composed of many community groups including the Moratorium Now! Coalition, Detroit BYP100, the Detroit People’s Platform, the United Community Housing Coalition and the American Civil Liberties Union."

"Since 2002, at least 150,000 Detroit residents have lost their homes for failure to pay taxes, or because they were renting from a landlord who, unbeknownst to them, had not been paying. In May, United Community Housing Coalition tax foreclosure prevention project coordinator Michele Oberholtzer explained the larger implications of the ongoing tax foreclosure crisis as she prepared a group of volunteers to reach out to Detroit residents affected:
"What we have is a system that is losing the city and the county money. It's resulting in people losing their homes, it's leading to vacancies and evictions, it's leading to concentrated properties in very few hands (with the Land Bank now owning more than 100,000 homes)," Oberholtzer told the group gathered at the nonprofit's offices. "And we have this downhill spiral that makes it harder for everyone in the community.""

"Annie Perry sits in a bejeweled knit cap, waiting for her number to be called at a foreclosure prevention meeting. ... It’s being hosted by the nonprofit, United Community Housing Coalition. Perry, an 83-year-old Alabama native, is facing tax-foreclosure on the house she and her husband bought in Detroit in 1970. Her southern manners show through when she talks about the people she’s met with at the Wayne County Treasurer’s office. ...'Very sweet girl,” Perry says. “All of them sweet down there. I want them to know that. Everybody’s nice.'"

"Many Detroit residents gathered at University of Detroit Mercy School of Law May 20 to attend a summit on housing in Detroit aimed at educating residents about their rights and options...  [state Rep. Stephanie] Chang has proposed a bill — House Bill 4456 — that would allow local governments to regulate rents of seniors and individuals with disabilities to protect them from being charged beyond their income, although she said the future of such measures is by no means a sure thing."

"The yearly effort to save thousands of Wayne County residents from losing their homes in the tax foreclosure auction is ramping up as a key deadline approaches, and a housing advocacy group is looking for volunteers to help go door-to-door to give Detroiters the information they need to keep a roof over their heads."

"Over the next few weeks, volunteers with the United Community Housing Coalition will be canvassing homes at risk at ending up on the annual Wayne County Tax Foreclosure auction."

"The clock is ticking on homeowners in Wayne County who received tax foreclosure notices. They have until June 7 to either pay their taxes or sign up for a payment plan. ...United Community Housing Coalition is conducting door-to-door outreach and providing counseling for homes facing foreclosure."

My Detroit Cable
April 28 2017 
"Rodney Cotton and 39,000 other Detroiters are able to keep their homes thanks to the Tax Foreclosure Prevention Program."

"A Detroit developer with big plans to buy up 25 square miles of property on the city's northwest side. ... But officials at United Community Housing Coalition question how much success this plan can achieve and point to other plans that had the same mission, but came up short. ... 'Paramount Mortgage is one that comes to mind a few years ago,' said attorney Ted Phillips. '(They) got 2,000 properties in a couple year period. They got $10 million in the Detroit police and fire pension fund. And when they left a short time later, 90 percent of those were in demolition status.'"

The Detroit News
January 17 2017 
One of the ways that low-income Detroit residents could avoid foreclosure is by applying for a state property tax exemption that would reduce or eliminate property taxes, officials say, but is it a multi-step process that must be applied for every year and is underutilized by at least 12,000 residents. Now, the University of Michigan is launching a partnership with United Community Housing Coalition, the Detroit organization helping residents avoid foreclosure, as part of an initiative aimed at finding solutions to address poverty."



Yes! Magazine
December 26, 2016
There are several reasons why Detroit faces such high rates of tax foreclosure. Detroit buildings have been overassessed using outdated property values, resulting in excessively high tax bills. In addition, though the city offers a poverty exemption based on income, many are unaware of the tax break or have difficulty obtaining it. Furthermore, with some properties selling for as little as $1,000, the Detroit housing market attracts unscrupulous investors who purchase homes, milk tenants for rent, then simply walk away from their properties.  ... There have been various efforts to respond to this crisis, with groups like the United Community Housing Coalition buying some houses and deeding them back to the original families."

Michigan Radio
December 8, 2016
“(We) make sure that if there are ways to get out of foreclosure, there are various kinds of payment plans and what have you, we work with them to do that. We try to work with them so they’re not throwing money away. And what I mean by that is if somebody owes seven, eight, nine thousand dollars worth of taxes, they have no business paying two or three thousand (dollars) and losing the house anyway. So, we try common sense kind of stuff,” Phillips explained.

Crain's Detroit Business
October 16, 2016
"But Ted Phillips says otherwise. He and others say the law boots home occupants to the streets while failing to prevent buyers like Karr from purchasing more properties. The entire regulatory framework needs to be scrapped and rewritten, said the longtime executive director of the nonprofit United Community Housing Coalition."

The Huffington Post
October 6, 2016
“You’re getting taxes assessed on a $30,000 or $40,000 property value for a house that probably couldn’t sell for more than $5,000,” explained Ted Phillips, executive director of the advocacy group United Community Housing Coalition. 

Model D
October 3, 2016
"A foreclosure crisis has gripped Detroit for over a decade. And with thousands of homes for sale in this year's Wayne County Tax Auction, the crisis is far from over."

Fox 2 News - Detroit (WJBK) 
June 18, 2016
"The City of Detroit is working to help homeowners avoid foreclosure." Click to see video.

The Detroit News
June 18, 2016
"Staggering numbers of people have faced foreclosure over the past decade in Detroit, more than 50,000-60,000, following changes in 2002 to a law that resulted in massive foreclosures on homeowners, said Ted Phillips, of the United Community Housing Coalition."

Are real estate investors from Oakland County to Hong Kong driving Detroit’s blight? 
Metrotimes
May 4, 2016
"I don't need somebody coming in and saving me, and it's really incredibly offensive to say so," Phillips says. "But it's doubly offensive when people act like they're there to repopulate the city ... but what they're doing is really just another way to make a killing off Detroit."

Detroit Free Press
April 25, 2016
"In Detroit, 'the biggest problem we’re seeing with mortgages is the reverse mortgage problem,' said Ted Phillips, executive director of the nonprofit United Community Housing Network, which battles on behalf of homeowners facing foreclosure."

My Detroit Cable
March 8, 2016
Tax Foreclosure video featuring the United Community Housing Coalition. "If you need help getting out of foreclosure, call the Wayne County Treasurer's Office at 313-224-5990..."

Channel 7, WXYZ.com
February 16, 2016
According to the city heat is finally back on in all units at the Atrium Apartments, but now the question is: What are tenants rights, if they want to move out? 'They want to make sure that they have documented their complaints and they can show the landlord breached, not them,' says Ted Phillips, Executive Director and Attorney for United Community Housing Coalition in Detroit.



The Huffington Post
November 3, 2015
“The Tricycle Collective partnered with United Community Housing Coalition, which conducted the bidding, and won homes for 18 of the 31 families. Among other anti-foreclosure work over the last few decades, UCHC has bid on homes for families since 2010 and won 1,600 overall.”

Michigan Radio
October 23, 2015
“Ted Phillips, director of the United Community Housing Coalition in Detroit, says tens of thousands more properties that went into foreclosure avoided going to auction. In part, that’s because state lawmakers made changes that allowed more struggling homeowners to get on payment plans, in some cases cutting the amount of back taxes owed and offering reduced interest rates. ‘Nevertheless, there still appears to have been 3500 or so homeowner-occupied homes in Detroit, and a few thousand others that were tenant-occupied, that ended up going to auction sale,’ said Phillips.” 

The Detroit News
October 22, 2015
"Applying to succeed Wojtowicz are... A panel of three officials — Clerk Cathy Garrett, Prosecutor Kym Worthy and Chief Probate Judge Freddie Burton Jr. — is expected to appoint an interim treasurer by next month. The post pays about $116,000. 'We need someone who can strike a balance between collection taxes and taking property,' said Ted Phillips, director of the United Community Housing Coalition, a nonprofit that works to help poor residents keep their homes."

Al-Jazeera America
October 6, 2015
“The coalition counsels thousands of people on how to get into the payment plans the county offers in order to help them stay in their homes. It does more of this kind of work than any other organization in Detroit. ‘These are people who lost their homes because they were poor or they were grossly overassessed or they were unaware that they could have gotten their taxes completely waived,’ says Phillips, referring to property tax exemption the city offers to people who live below the poverty line.”

The Detroit Free Press
August 15, 2015
"Once Clark became her lawyer, even though she’d missed the deadline, he tried again. In January 2014, Clark appealed to Trott & Trott, and to the firm’s client Fannie Mae, to sell Whitfield the house. To fund the deal, he enlisted the United Community Housing Coalition, a Detroit-based nonprofit organization, which agreed to pool its funds with Whitfield’s money to make an offer on her behalf of $8,850, amounting to 95% of the $9,000 appraisal. There was no response, Clark said."

Bloomberg News 
March 11, 2015
Buyers like Gresham rarely get the help ‘most middle-income people get,’ said Ted Phillips, executive director of United Community Housing Coalition, which advocates on behalf of delinquent homeowners. ‘They don’t have an attorney, they don’t have a Realtor, they don’t have a title company,’ Phillips said. ‘They believe the handshake. They believe the house is perfect and doesn’t have back taxes. As a result, they may be in foreclosure three days after they buy the house.’”



The New York Times
June 26, 2014
“Ted Phillips, the executive director of the United Community Housing Coalition, where a worn office is regularly crowded with families in search of a last-ditch way to save their homes, has watched their numbers swell. ‘If we don’t make some changes with what we’re doing, I don’t know where this ends.’ Mr. Phillips said.”

The Atlantic
October 22, 2014
“Ted Phillips, the director of the United Community Housing Coalition in downtown Detroit, has been leading the charge to inform people about their options once their houses have been foreclosed on. If they aren’t granted an extension or put on a payment plan, the coalition will do its best to bid on their homes. Phillips says he and his team of seven will be cramming round a conference table this week, seeking to buy back around 500 houses at an estimated average price of $1,250. When a wave of foreclosures hit the city a decade ago, the United Community Housing Coalition was able to prevent most evictions, but there are too many foreclosures now for the organization to fight all of them.”



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